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Nodulaid by BASF - Packshot Australia

Nodulaid®

Inoculant

A small investment with very valuable rewards

Nodulaid® is Australia’s leading peat inoculant. A pioneering brand that has been associated with many breakthroughs over the decades, Nodulaid continues to be a pacesetter for the quality of its production and reliable performance.

For just a few dollars a hectare, Nodulaid inoculant will deliver a substantial boost in the yield of pulse crops and provide residual nitrogen worth many times what it costs to produce.

Key benefits

  • Incorporating targeted AIRG-supplied rhizobia strains cultured and re-tested in our own local laboratory.
  • Average yield gain across five pulse crops in 11 replicated trials of 7%.
  • Potent formulation manufactured with over one billion live rhizobia cells per gram.
  • High quality peat mixes easily with water, saving valuable time at application.

How it works

Nodulaid® is produced by culturing different strains of rhizobia which will form a symbiotic relationship with the various registered crops to stimulate nodulation. The nodules that grow on the roots produce enough nitrogen to both increase the growth and yield of the host plant itself and leave sufficient residual nitrogen in the soil to feed the following crop.

The various strains of rhizobia are classified into Groups matched to the crops they can inoculate. Ten different Nodulaid products are produced in the lead-up to every season, each containing rhizobia from a different group.

You can learn more about the scientific principles behind the yield boost inoculants provide by watching the video below.

What our customers are saying

Scott Hutchings, Senior agronomist at Cox Rural in Keith

It’s amazing. With good nodulation, you can get 50 to 100 units of nitrogen a hectare – the equivalent of eighty to a hundred dollars’ worth of urea for a relatively small spend.

Scott Hutchings, Cox Rural Keith

Crop suitability